Scientists witness giant star explode throwing a final, radiant light all over

Scientists witness giant star explode throwing a final, radiant light all over
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There is a star, a big one, which is ten times more massive than the sun destructed itself after presenting the cosmos with a final, radiant beacon of starlight.

So far, experts believed that the biggest stars in the universe died with a whimper. But it was only in 2020 that the astronomers saw the opposite.

For the first time, scientists watched a red supergiant star explode. They noticed the stellar leviathan, located about 120 million light-years from our planet earth in the NGC 5731 galaxy, glistening before its death.

This star’s extreme illumination indicates that it was not dormant as previously observed red supergiants had been prior to their death.

Researchers never saw such violent activity in a dying red supergiant star; this luminous emission was never seen before.

The researchers collected data from Hawaii’s Keck Observatory Deep Imaging and Multi-Object Spectrograph as well as Near-Infrared Echellette Spectrograph.

In the future, researchers now hope to continue using the remote method to document more such happenings, including events involving other enormous supernovas.

To detect more events like SN2020tlf, it will help theorists solve the mystery of how massive stars spend the final moments of their lives.

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