WHO recommended treatments for Covid-19

WHO recommended treatments for Covid-19 as per revised guidelines
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The World Health Organization (WHO) has approved two new treatments for Covid-19. This comes amid the fresh spurt in Omicron cases globally. The unprecedented infection tally has begun straining the healthcare system even in the most developed places of the world.

WHO recommends arthritis drug baricitinib and synthetic antibody treatment Sotrovimab to get rid of serious illness and death from Covid-19.

As per the experts, use of Baricitinib as an alternative to interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor blockers, in combination with corticosteroids, to treat severe or critical Covid patients is strongly recommended.

Scientists suggest that the use of baricitinib with corticosteroids in severe Covid patients led to better survival rates and reduced need for ventilators.

Besides, the revised WHO guidelines say, “the strong recommendation for baricitinib in those with severe or critical illness reflects moderate certainty evidence for benefits on mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay (high certainty) with no observed increase in adverse effects leading to drug discontinuation.”

WHO recommended Covid Treatment

The experts also suggest both have similar effects; and the decision should be based on issues including cost and clinician experience.

Moreover, WHO recommended Sotrovimab for people with non-serious Covid. It is for those at the highest risk of hospitalisation, like elderly and people with chronic diseases.

The use of Sotrovimab in patients with non-severe illness led to a substantial reduction in hospitalisation risk.

Although, the drug probably is having little or no impact on mortality and on mechanical ventilation. These all evidences come as per the new guidelines.

The world health body also says that there were insufficient data to recommend one monoclonal antibody treatment over another.

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